Pinball Hall of Fame

Odd Collections,On the Road,People,This Week in History,Travel Destinations
January 6, 2011

Collector allows visitors to play vintage pinball machines at Las Vegas museum

Tim Arnold keeps the love for pinball alive at the Pinball Hall of Fame in Las Vegas.“I become one with the ball,” says Arnold, who still enjoys pitting his pinball prowess against gravity.Janice Markovics, who played pinball as a youngster, refreshes her gaming skills while touring the Pinball Hall of Fame.More than 250 vintage games manufactured primarily from the 1940s to the 1990s are available for visitors to play.
David Becker
David Becker
David Becker
David Becker
Tim Arnold keeps the love for pinball alive at the Pinball Hall of Fame in Las Vegas.
“I become one with the ball,” says Arnold, who still enjoys pitting his pinball prowess against gravity.
Janice Markovics, who played pinball as a youngster, refreshes her gaming skills while touring the Pinball Hall of Fame.
More than 250 vintage games manufactured primarily from the 1940s to the 1990s are available for visitors to play.
http://pgoaamericanprofile2.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/tim-arnold-pinball-machine.jpg

Tim Arnold, 54, is a study in concentration as he hunches over his favorite pinball game, a 1976 Jack’s Open, inside his Pinball Hall of Fame in Las Vegas, Nev.

Middle fingers on the flipper buttons and eyes focused on a silver ball bouncing around the colorful playfield, Arnold leans forward with quiet intensity—one leg forward, one leg back—using both subtle wrist movements and body-heaving jerks to propel the ball upward. “Ping, ping, ping!” sounds the machine as the ball knocks down one drop-down target after another, rhythmically ratcheting up Arnold’s score.

“It’s man versus machine,” Arnold says later, recapping his performance. “With a nudge or shake, you can change everything. You fight against the ball and gravity. There’s thinking and strategy involved.”

In a city known for video poker, roulette wheels and slot machines, Arnold has created a nostalgic oasis of vintage pinball machines from the 1940s to the 1990s at his Las Vegas attraction, where both retro-minded novices and genuine pinball wizards pit their prowess against gravity—all while donating quarters to charity.

“The Pinball Hall of Fame is the only place in the world to lay your hands on a significant collection of pinball machines,” says Michael Schiess, executive director of the Pacific Pinball Museum in Alameda, Calif., which celebrates the art, science and history of pinball. “Often collectors are wealthy people who have them in their private game rooms. Collectors for the most part never let the public play their machines.”

For Arnold, half the fun of pinball is watching other people play—not just look at—the vintage machines he has loved since age 14 when he bought his first one, a 1966 Gottlieb game called Mayfair, while growing up in Lansing, Mich. Later, he and his older brother, Tom, owned Pinball Pete’s arcades in Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich., during the coin-operated Pac-Man era. In 1990, as the videogame industry boomed, Arnold sold his share of the arcade business, retired and moved to Las Vegas, bringing along 400 of the 1,000 pinball machines he eventually accumulated while shaping his vision of a place for people to play the great machines of the past for fun—and charity.

He and his wife, Charlotte, built a 10,000-square-foot building in their backyard to store and restore his machines. There, the couple began hosting “fun night” fundraisers, donating $600,000 to the Salvation Army and other local charities over six years.

“When I was growing up, every adult I knew belonged to some kind of social club and did fundraisers to help those in need,” he says. “My thinking was, ‘Why don’t we pinball collectors do something to help our community and have fun?”

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